Quick Answer: What Style Came After Rococo?

Who are three important Rococo artists?

10 Artworks That Defined the Rococo StyleJean-Antoine Watteau, Pilgrimage to Cythera (1717)François Boucher, Triumph of Venus (1740)Jean-Honoré Fragonard, The Meeting (from the “Loves of the Shepherds”)(1771–72)Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, Portrait of the Marquise de Pompadour (1748–55)Luis Paret y Alcázar, Charles III Dining Before the Court (c.More items…•.

Is Versailles Baroque or Rococo?

The Palace of Versailles is Baroque. It was inspired by the Baroque architecture that originated in Italy but was constructed in a classical French Baroque style. …

What came first Baroque or Rococo?

The Baroque movement began in Rome in the early 1600s and spread throughout Europe by the 17th and 18th centuries. Rococo art dominated the French art scene mainly during the early 18th century.

What was going on during the rococo period?

The Rococo period was a period in which predominantly french artists reacted against the Baroque style. They despised its strict regulations on grandeur, symmetry and lines as well as its predominantly dark colors. In this way, they did the opposite.

What was one place where Rococo flourished?

The emphasis was on naturalistic ornament, either carved or engraved. The style originated in Italy, flourished in France beginning in the 1730s, in England in the 1740s, and in America in the 1750s.

Where did the Rococo style originated?

ParisRococo, style in interior design, the decorative arts, painting, architecture, and sculpture that originated in Paris in the early 18th century but was soon adopted throughout France and later in other countries, principally Germany and Austria.

What does Baroque mean?

Baroque came to English from a French word meaning “irregularly shaped.” At first, the word in French was used mostly to refer to pearls. Eventually, it came to describe an extravagant style of art characterized by curving lines, gilt, and gold.

What type of gown was most associated with the rococo style?

The exuberant, playful, elegant style of decoration and design that we now know to be ‘Rococo’ was then known as le style rocaille, le style moderne, le gout. A style that appeared in the early eighteenth-century was the robe volante, a flowing gown, that became popular towards the end of King Louis XIV’s reign.

What defines the Rococo style?

Rococo painting, which originated in early 18th century Paris, is characterized by soft colors and curvy lines, and depicts scenes of love, nature, amorous encounters, light-hearted entertainment, and youth. The word “rococo” derives from rocaille, which is French for rubble or rock.

What color is Rococo?

Rococo: A style of baroque architecture and decorative art, from 18th century France, having elaborate ornamentation. pastel: Any of several subdued tints of colors, usually associated with pink, peach, yellow, green, blue, and lavender.

What influenced rococo art?

In painting Rococo was primarily influenced by the Venetian School’s use of color, erotic subjects, and Arcadian landscapes, while the School of Fontainebleau was foundational to Rococo interior design.

What era was Rococo?

The Rococo movement was an artistic period that emerged in France and spread thrartisticoughout the world in the late 17th and early 18th century. The word is a derivative of the French term rocaille, which means “rock and shell garden ornamentation”.

What is the difference between Baroque and Rococo style?

Rococo developed out of Baroque. Both styles feature elaborate ornament and decoration, and both were used in large structures with a social or cultural status. … Baroque architecture is serious, dramatic, and heavy. On the other hand, Rococo is light, airy, and decorative.

How was rococo a departure from the early Baroque style?

Though Rococo emerged from Baroque art, Rococo artists turned away from Baroque’s dramatic symbolism of the church’s power. Instead, they honed in on elegantly elevating the power and class of French aristocrats. Rococo represented “secular high fashion.”